tumblingdoe:

; sometimes the teachers, and counselors, the helpers need help too. We can’t just take laughs, we must give them too for the strongest, bravest, most delightful of us all are still human beings. RIP R.W. 

tumblingdoe:

; sometimes the teachers, and counselors, the helpers need help too. We can’t just take laughs, we must give them too for the strongest, bravest, most delightful of us all are still human beings. RIP R.W. 

(Source: brokenthimble)


“You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it."  - Robin Williams [July 29th 1951 - August 11th 2014]

You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it."
Robin Williams
[July 29th 1951 - August 11th 2014]

(Source: peterhale)

queendanneelackles:

When I was upset or suffering from a terrible day, nothing cheered me up more, even for a minute, than watching this man’s films or watching his interviews online. There is no way you could not laugh or crack a smile and his comedic nature. Thank you Robin. 

andrewbelami:

one of the best skits on The Carol Burnett Show where Robin Williams helps Carol through the grieving process

karlrincon:

Rest in peace, Robin Williams.

When Sharing Is Wrong in Adoption « Gazillion Voices

peaceshannon:

to adoptive parents who feel no moral issues with posting the private stories and histories of their adopted children and their first families (some even making money off it from writing books and sponsored blogs to photo exhibitions, etc.), take note: it is never ok without express, informed consent. and as the article points out, no a child of 6, 10, 14 (esp one who has internalized the need to feel grateful) cannot give informed consent about having their private histories open to the public. if you don’t think your child is old enough to manage their own SNS account, then you acknowledge they don’t fully understand how permanant and public it can be and therefore are unable to make an informed decision about what they are putting online. until they are of the age that you believe they can do that, you should realize they can’t give informed consent to you either. once they’re of the age they can give informed consent, it is then THEIR decision and THEIR story to tell, NOT yours.

"Had the Internet been so easy (type, point, click!) when my children were growing up, I could have posted some great stories that other parents could have learned from and perhaps admired. I would have been wrong to do so, especially as an adoptive parent. I would have been wrong to sacrifice, eternally and publicly, my children’s privacy and their personal stories for the sake of Internet strangers.

Making money from it would have been even more sordid.

My becoming a mother meant my children had to lose the family into which they were born. Regardless of how we might be tempted to assess the quality of life with and without the original family, it is a significant loss. It reverberates through childhood and adolescence, right into adulthood. Not only did they lose their original family, they often also lost the physical resemblance, the heritage, the family stories, the knowledge of genetic and medical issues, the siblings, the grandparents: all the things that we non-adopted people take for granted.

What right do I have to create further losses for my children by taking their personal histories and handing them over to strangers, via the Internet, the newspaper, or a book?And not just to thousands of strangers—what about neighbors, teachers, co-workers, future employers, future boyfriends/girlfriends?

I reject out of hand the argument that my children’s stories might help others, and so that is a good enough reason for overt public sharing. I do not believe that the benefits for strangers should be placed on the backs of our children’s stories.”

"Spiritual progress is like detoxification. Things have to come up in order to be released. Once we have asked to be healed, then our unhealed places are forced to the surface."

- Marianne Williamson (via happyasatree)

(Source: unconditionedconsciousness)

"

True gender equality is actually perceived as inequality. A group that is made up of 50% women is perceived as being mostly women. A situation that is perfectly equal between men and women is perceived as being biased in favor of women.

And if you don’t believe me, you’ve never been a married woman who kept her family name. I have had students hold that up as proof of my “sexism.”

My own brother told me that he could never marry a woman who kept her name because “everyone would know who ruled that relationship.” Perfect equality – my husband keeps his name and I keep mine – is held as a statement of superiority on my part.

"

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